Story 4: The Battle of Curruption

Meet Luis Pinto. He serves as a leader for the GLS in Guatemala. Watch his story as he talks about the corruption leaders face in Guatemala.

Help WCA bring the GLS to under-resourced areas of the world. Together we can train more Christian leaders to stand against corruption. Through donation, here’s how you can help:

$50 – help a courageous leader in an under resourced part of the world attend a local GLS and get access to other tools and resources
$250 – Send a church team to the GLS to form a bond of cooperation and accountability that can strengthen the heart of a church
$500 – Training for local volunteers, producers and technical directors for each new GLS
$1500 – Cover the cost to translate one Summit Session into 1 of 55 languages
$3500 – Provide all the technology necessary to host the GLS in under-resourced cities.

EQUIPPING LEADERS. INSPIRING A GRANDER VISION.

DONATE

Story 3: Overcoming Challenges

Meet Paothang Haokip. He serves in India as a leader of the GLS. Watch his story as he talks about overcoming challenges as a Christian minority.

Help us bring the GLS to under-resourced areas of the world. Together we can help make more stories like Paothang’s a reality. Through donation, here’s how you can help:

$50 – help a courageous leader in an under resourced part of the world attend a local GLS and get access to other tools and resources
$250 – Send a church team to the GLS to form a bond of cooperation and accountability that can strengthen the heart of a church
$500 – Training for local volunteers, producers and technical directors for each new GLS
$1500 – Cover the cost to translate one Summit Session into 1 of 55 languages
$3500 – Provide all the technology necessary to host the GLS in under-resourced cities.

EQUIPPING LEADERS. INSPIRING A GRANDER VISION.

DONATE

Story 2: The Platform

Meet Gabriel Makan. He is a GLS leader in Nigeria, Africa. Watch his story to hear about the impact of the platform.

Help us bring the GLS to under-resourced areas of the world. Together we can help make more stories like Gabriel’s a reality. Through donation, here’s how you can help:

$50 – help a courageous leader in an under resourced part of the world attend a local GLS and get access to other tools and resources
$250 – Send a church team to the GLS to form a bond of cooperation and accountability that can strengthen the heart of a church
$500 – Training for local volunteers, producers and technical directors for each new GLS
$1500 – Cover the cost to translate one Summit Session into 1 of 55 languages
$3500 – Provide all the technology necessary to host the GLS in under-resourced cities.

EQUIPPING LEADERS. INSPIRING A GRANDER VISION.

DONATE

Story 1: It was the beginning of a change

It was the beginning of a change. Its my story. It is why I do the GLS.

Meet Piotr Gasiorowski. He is a leader for The Global Leadership Summit (GLS) in Eastern Europe. Watch to hear how his story started.

Help us bring the GLS to under-resourced areas of the world. Together we can help make more stories like Piotr’s a reality. Through donation, here’s how you can help:

$50 – help a courageous leader in an under resourced part of the world attend a local GLS and get access to other tools and resources
$250 – Send a church team to the GLS to form a bond of cooperation and accountability that can strengthen the heart of a church
$500 – Training for local volunteers, producers and technical directors for each new GLS
$1500 – Cover the cost to translate one Summit Session into 1 of 55 languages
$3500 – Provide all the technology necessary to host the GLS in under-resourced cities.

EQUIPPING LEADERS. INSPIRING A GRANDER VISION.

DONATE

Gifts That Impact The World

As a leader with your own unique challenges, we know you can appreciate the diversity and complexity of the challenges facing many leaders around the world–apathy, poverty, corruption, war and oppression. The Global Leadership Summit empowers us to meet these challenges head on, regardless of where we lead.

Christ-centered leadership really matters–especially in environments with a lack of education, mentoring and other opportunities designed to help us get better. This is why we are committed to serving leaders regardless of geography or economic means.

But we can’t do it alone.

In the next week we are going to be sharing stories of people from around the world. Because of partnerships and gifts from leaders like you, these stories have been made possible.

Will you partner with us in 2015? Here are a few ways that you can help:

$50 – help a courageous leader in an under resourced part of the world attend a local GLS and get access to other tools and resources
$250 – Send a church team to the GLS to form a bond of cooperation and accountability that can strengthen the heart of a church
$500 – train local volunteer producers and technical directors for each new GLS
$1500 – Cover the cost to translate one Summit Session into 1 of 55 languages
$3500 – Provide all the technology necessary to host the GLS in under-resourced cities.

Your gift changes the outcome for leaders in the most challenging environments.


GIVE THE GIFT OF LEADERSHIP. DONATE TODAY!

Finding Center

“Somebody has said that what an actor has to do is be clear, and in order to be clear as an actor, you have to be clear to yourself. I don’t think it’s possible to be a good actor without some very distinct center. I think a good actor has got to be, in a way, almost like a priest. That there is a purity of spirit involved which makes it possible for ideas to be conveyed through that person to the audience, that the actor becomes a kind of conductor or a medium, or a way of transferring something abstract and indefinable to an audience.”— Christopher Walken

When I was in college I thought the weirder you were, the more creative you’d be.

And the more creative you were, the better art you’d make. Oh, how I wish it were that easy!

If only I simply needed to be weird, out there, and different in order to make good art.

To be honest, I wouldn’t have to do much work, I already feel that way, and I imagine you do, too. However, eccentricity is not necessarily the mark of a true artist. In fact, it can often mean the exact opposite. Being eccentric isn’t nearly enough to make good work and is too often a distraction for the professional creator as the word quite literally means being “off center.”

Artists are rebels and so they should be.

We exist to offer a different point of view. We are prophets who often go against the mainstream. But sometimes artists get so carried away with their rebellion they begin to wage war with their own center of gravity. They lose this “purity of spirit” in exchange for mere difference. Again, rarely is it mere eccentricity or fringe living that makes for a good piece of art, or a good life, for that matter.

I remember one of the last shows I did before taking my sabbatical. I was the youngest person in the cast surrounded by a truckload of incredible older actors all in their 50′s and 60′s. Between shows and rehearsals, we’d chat about different parts of the business and their lives. I’d always be asking for advice. They were amazing actors and I wanted to be just like them. But after about five weeks together I noticed an unsettling trend. All but two of the ten actors were divorced and in every case the divorces were directly related to their lives as actors.

One actor in particular, when asked to reveal a little more of his story, began to tell me that as a young artist he simply didn’t believe the rules applied to him. For him to have the freedom to create, he needed to be different, which meant doing whatever he pleased, whenever he felt like it. I heard story after story of sadness and ruin all in the name of art.

These men had spent their lives being so eccentric and living on the fringe for the sake of their craft that they lost bits of their souls, and in some cases, their entire families along the way.

I’m all for fringe exploration. I’m all for rebellion. I’m all for slashing through the empire. But not if it costs me my center.

I’m very protective of this place because I know what it feels like to try and make from a place that is in pieces. In fact, much of my art up until the last five years was created from a broken center.

My actor friends are good artists, but I imagine the great artists they could be if they were to create from a center that was distinct and whole.

Thanks only to grace, my center is now becoming as such and it is from this place where I now create. I must know it well and I must not hide from it, even if being eccentric makes me appear more artistic or on the edge.

When we live off-center, we run the risk of jamming the conductor that is meant to be clear, whole, and ready to reveal to our audience what has been revealed to us. As artists we must work to find our center and keep it both holy and wholly.

– Blaine Hogan, Creative Director at Willow Creek
For more on becoming a better human and a better artist, check out Make Better, a brand new 8-week online course taught by Blaine.

Focusing on Fit

16x9-20140905-IMG_9073

What do you do when you get that familiar pit in your stomach, as you’re about to meet with someone you’ve been working with integrating into your team because you just know it’s not going to work out? You’ve probably even known it for a while.

Most leaders have been there; the question is how do you avoid it?

Here’s what I mean; let me tell you about Bob, a client of mine. Bob was an excellent director of sales. He was detail-oriented, knew how to get things done for customers within the organization, and had the respect of his team.  But then the CEO promoted him to the vice president of sales role. The VP spot required evangelizing new solutions in front of clients, something Bob had real trouble with.

The CEO was so committed to making him successful that she worked with Bob month after month, often doing the job herself or relying on other executive team members to do it. She spent time and money training Bob; she even hired the Table Group to do some organizational health work with Bob and his team. Bob still wasn’t a great fit – both the smart and the healthy sides were misaligned. Eventually, Bob lost so much credibility within the organization that it was impossible to move him into another position, and the CEO let him go. It was painful for the CEO and hard on Bob, who was blindsided by the move.

Hindsight provides so much clarity.  Today, the CEO says that she knew within a few months that Bob was not in the right role, but Bob was loyal to the company and the CEO wanted to make him successful. This was a mix of hubris and optimism. She thought time would help solve the issue. In fact, time hurt.  Bob could have recovered if he had been moved to a role that took advantage of his unique talents before his long, slow decline undermined the trust the team had in him. Instead, he agonized, the team withered, and the company suffered.

Consider this more desirable outcome from another client. The CEO of a 100-year-old business thought that he had identified his successor in an internal, long-term operations executive who embodied the values of the company. He and the operations guy, Dennis, met weekly to discuss the needs of the role. They focused on Dennis’ progress from operational to strategic thinking, an area that they had both agreed was a potential trouble spot in his ability to lead the company through imminent international expansion. The CEO and Dennis had difficult discussions over several months about poorly defined strategies and, after some time, the CEO and Dennis agreed that he was more valuable (and happy) becoming COO and they needed to find an altogether different CEO.

The company has since hired a CEO who is successfully leading it into new markets, with Dennis playing a critical role in setting up state-of-the-art operations abroad.  While there were many difficult discussions along the way, the outcome couldn’t be better.

The point here is that while letting our existing employees off easy might seem like the respectful thing to do, it actually reduces the probability of a good fit. Keep the memory of that pit in your stomach and the blind-sided employee in your mind as you have those important, early conversations.

Here are a few things to focus on as you transition and integrate employees:

  • When hiring, interview for cultural fit. This will allow you to reinforce your core values as well as to ensure that the employee is emotionally on board as they climb the ladder.
  • Make your promotion and transition process as rigorous as your hiring process.
  • Understand the unique strengths and weaknesses of your people.
  • Be clear about the skill requirements and key responsibilities and discuss areas for development before the promotion.
  • Continuously monitor goals and the plan for success.

Helping employees find roles for their true talents might be the most rewarding role of leaders.  You just have to be brave enough to have the tough conversations to reap the rewards.

By Patrick Lencioni, Originally posted at TableGroup.com.

More Than Doing Less

c9e42240

I am not naturally inclined to lead a simple life. I feel a strong sense of responsibility to the calling God has entrusted to me—not just at work, but also with my family, the relationships I invest in, the recreation I need for my mental health, and the travel my work requires.

Can you relate?

Simplified living is about more than doing less. It’s about being who God called us to be, with a wholehearted, single-minded focus. It’s walking away from innumerable lesser opportunities in favor of the few to which we’ve been called and for which we’ve been created. It’s a lifestyle that allows us, when our heads hit the pillow at night, to reflect with gratitude that our day was well invested and the varied responsibilities of our lives are in order.

If we don’t change how we live, our overcomplicated world will begin to feel frighteningly normal. We will become accustomed to life at a frantic pace, no longer able to discriminate between the important and the unessential. And that’s the danger: When we fritter away our one and only life doing things that don’t really matter, we sacrifice the things that do matter. Through more misses than hits, I have experienced the high cost of allowing my life to get out of control. My desire is to spare you some of the pain of learning these lessons the hard way.

In my experience, a handful of key practices are vital to keeping my soul clutter-free. These practices help me overcome the barriers that keep me from living the life “to the full” that Jesus promises in John 10:10. But there are no shortcuts to simplified living. Untangling yourself from the overscheduled, overwhelming web of your current life is not for the faint of heart. It’s honest, rigorous work. Action is required. That’s why you need to answer those nagging questions about what keeps you in bondage to such frenetic, cluttered patterns; and that’s why you need some hands-on practices for eradicating clutter from your soul and moving toward a simplified life. Don’t let an intellectual nod to the concept of simplified living inoculate you against making actual changes in your life. Rather, apply real solutions with courage and grit.

I can tell you from my own experience that simplifying your life will produce immediate rewards. Each day will have a clear purpose, and each relationship will receive the investment it’s due. And without the needless clutter clanging around in your soul, you’ll be able to hear—and respond to—each whisper from God.

Change is possible. Whether you’re teetering on the edge of a cluttered collapse or you’re just starting to realize that some minor life adjustments are in order, you can simplify. You may well have to simplify to live the life God invites you to live. As you begin to implement certain key practices, they will become habits that create simplified days, months, years, and eventually a lifetime that brings satisfaction and fulfillment.

This is an excerpt from Simplify by Bill Hybels. Read more at http://www.simplifybook.com

Sacrifice for Leadership Training in Zambia

Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 10.21.53 PM

The GLS provides accessible and affordable leadership development tools to leaders in Zambia who face immense challenges and complexities. Churches are growing in Zambia, but leaders carry the responsibility not only of fostering spiritual growth within the church, but also face the challenges of providing resources to combat the reality of poverty and HIV/ AIDS. When we see the intense sacrifices these leaders make to at­tend the GLS and receive training and encouragement, we feel the deep need for lead­ership. Some leaders even traveled long distances from Malawi and Angola to attend. One of the leaders who traveled from Angola hopes to bring the GLS to his country some day.

“We thank God for the opportunity to host the 2014 GLS. I was touched by four young people who traveled 314km to come to the Summit, that is why we ended up paying for their accommodations due to the sacrifice they made. Another leader took leadership initiative, and worked hard to raise the funds for his participation.” – George, GLS Leader, Zambia

The GLS in Ndola Zambia encouraged and trained 370 leaders in attendance. The ses­sions provoked passionate discussions, that inspired “grander visions” for leaders’ communities.

“Church leaders need to do more to challenge our faith community [so] that they learn to feel the pain and get angry enough to do something about corruption, and gender based violence.” – Leornado, GLS attendee, Zambia
Hunger and Thankfulness in Namibia

The experience of the GLS in Ongwediva, Namibia can be summarized in two words—Hunger and Thankfulness.

Hunger: The people in the far North are spiritually hungry, and an event like the GLS is such a blessing to them. One pastor begged to bring the GLS to his church on the bor­­der of Angola. He explained that he has not missed one of the GLS events in the past four years, but his people are desperate to be trained as well. Who knows, maybe we can take it to their community one day!

Thankfulness: One woman who attended is completely blind, in fact, she doesn’t even have eyeballs. People led her around, and she sat through the entire GLS. How that must feel—not to see the lights, the stage, the worship team, or the speakers on the screen. But she had this amazing smile on her face. Friends, we should be more thank­ful for ALL the spiritual growth opportunities we have.

God is doing great things through the GLS in Namibia. Strategically, the GLS is also helping to train and encourage government officials. Pray for each leader—that they take what they have learned to build the nation God has imagined for this region.

Sacrifice for Leadership Training in Zambia

unnamed

 

 

 

 

The GLS provides accessible and affordable leadership development tools to leaders in Zambia who face immense challenges and complexities. Churches are growing in Zambia, but leaders carry the responsibility not only of fostering spiritual growth within the church, but also face the challenges of providing resources to combat the reality of poverty and HIV/ AIDS. When we see the intense sacrifices these leaders make to at­tend the GLS and receive training and encouragement, we feel the deep need for lead­ership. Some leaders even traveled long distances from Malawi and Angola to attend. One of the leaders who traveled from Angola hopes to bring the GLS to his country some day.

“We thank God for the opportunity to host the 2014 GLS. I was touched by four young people who traveled 314km to come to the Summit, that is why we ended up paying for their accommodations due to the sacrifice they made. Another leader took leadership initiative, and worked hard to raise the funds for his participation.” – George, GLS Leader, Zambia

The GLS in Ndola Zambia encouraged and trained 370 leaders in attendance. The ses­sions provoked passionate discussions, that inspired “grander visions” for leaders’ communities.

“Church leaders need to do more to challenge our faith community [so] that they learn to feel the pain and get angry enough to do something about corruption, and gender based violence.” – Leornado, GLS attendee, Zambia

Visit FollowtheGLS.com to learn more about the work of the GLS around the globe.